Event

China executed approximately 2,400 people in 2013. China executes more people every year than the rest of the world combined. It puts more people to death per week than the U.S. does per year. Currently, 55 crimes are punishable by death, many of which are nonviolent or economic offenses. In addition, China’...

Reports

“Criminalizing Dissent” is a historical report highlighting the exceedingly parallel histories of China and Cuba from 1949-1979. In addition to comparing the development of the revolutionary...

Publications

Ye Shaohua was accused of “collaborating with overseas enemies” after expressing his wish to travel overseas and unite with family members in a letter sent to a relative in the U.S. Ye was labeled a “counterrevolutionary” and sentenced to...

News & Views

Chinese court has convicted veteran journalist Gao Yu for revealing state secrets and sentenced her to seven years in prison. Last November, in a closed trial, the No. 3 Intermediate People's Court in Beijing had twice delayed handing down a verdict. The government had accused Gao of disclosing a highly confidential "Document No. 9" issued by the ruling Communist Party leadership in 2013 to an...
The five Chinese women's right activists originally detained in early March have been released after more than a month in the Haidian Detention Center outside of Beijing. The five—Wei Tingting, Wang Man, Zheng Churan, Li Tingting, and Wu Rongrong—were detained on the eve of International Women’s Day for planning a campaign against sexual harassment on public transportation. The release of the...
Per multiple reports, Xue Feng, a Chinese born US citizen, was released from Beijing Number 2 Prison recently. Xue was originally detained in November 2007 for “stealing state secrets.” The charge stemmed from allegations that Xue had relayed sensitive information regarding the Chinese oil industry to foreigners while on a business trip. According to Xue, however, the information was only...

Commentaries

Nearly three weeks have passed since The Wall Street Journal published David Shambaugh’s “The Coming Chinese Crackup.” Contemporary China scholars have almost uniformly applauded Shambaugh’s analysis and welcomed his controversial thesis of the Chinese Communist Party’s imminent fall. Citing five “cracks,” including a troubled economy, uncontrollable corruption, regime loyalists who lack vigor, Xi’s crackdown campaign that affirms “anxiety and insecurity” within the central leadership, and...
The Laogai Research Foundation is currently editing and hoping to publish a manuscript in the coming months that highlights China's most infamous prison, Qincheng Prison. The working title of the manuscript is A Product of the Revolution: Qincheng Prison and its Prisoners . The following is a sample of the manuscript, written by the manuscript's editor. Editor's Note At its core, A Product of the Revolution is a testimony to the enduring and collective spirit of the Chinese political dissident...
Last month we wrote a commentary that sought to answer this question: Will Xinjiang radicalize in response to continued Chinese suppression? At the time, our answer was quite ambiguous. "Xinjiang’s status as a police-state undoubtedly quells the transfer of jihadist propaganda and probably dissuades terrorist acts, yet the brutal suppression of traditional and docile Uyghur customs[1] by Chinese authorities undoubtedly fosters resentment that could prove to be a radicalizing force. Moreover, if...